Contributors

Robert Elgie (robert.elgie@dcu.ie) is the general manager/editor of the project. He has been Paddy Moriarty Professor of Government and International Studies at Dublin City University since 2001. He is a member of the Royal irish Academy. He has published numerous books, including Semi-Presidentialism: Sub-types and Democratic Performance (Oxford University Press, 2011), as well as a number of co-edited publications with Sophia Moestrup, such as Semi-Presidentialism in Central and Eastern Europe (Manchester University Press, 2008). He has published in journals such as Comparative Political Studies, British Journal of Political Science, Political Research Quarterly, and Journal of Democracy. He is the editor of the journal French Politics. He is the lead co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of French Politics which will be published in 2014. He is the Review Editor for Government and Opposition. He has a personal website at www.semipresidentialism.com and can be followed on Twitter @robertelgie.

If you have any questions about the project in general, please contact Robert Elgie. If you have any specific enquiries or requests for expertise regarding any of the posts, then please contact the respective author.

The contributors and co-owners of the project are:

Kerryn BakerKerryn Baker (kerryn.baker@anu.edu.au) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the State, Society and Governance in Melanesia Program at the Australian National University. Her PhD thesis looked at how political actors interpreted success in parliamentary gender quota campaigns in the Pacific Islands region. Her research interests include elections and electoral reform in Melanesia and the broader Pacific Islands region, with a particular focus on women’s political representation.

 

 

Foto op 25-11-2012 om 14.20Lydia Beuman (lydia.beuman@dcu.ie) is a Postdoctoral Fellow at Dublin City University. Her doctoral thesis ‘Political Institutions in East Timor: Semi-Presidentialism and Democratic Performance’ has been published by Routledge in 2016. Her research interest are on the intersection of political institutions, conflict management and democratisation. Currently, she is working on governments of national unity and political stability.

 

 

BucurCristina Bucur (cristina.bucur@stv.uio.no) is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Political Science at University of Oslo. She completed her PhD in principal-agent theory and ministerial turnover in semi-presidential systems at Dublin City University in 2013. Her research interests focus on intra-party politics, political institutions, and executive-legislative relations. She has previously taught European politics at Dublin City University and University College Cork.

 

 

Nic large pictureNic Cheeseman (niccheeseman@gmail.com) is the Director of the African Studies Centre an Associate Professor of African Politics at Jesus College, Oxford University. His research addresses a range of questions such as whether populism is an effective electoral strategy in Africa, how paying tax changes citizens’ attitudes towards democracy corruption, and the conditions under which ruling parties lose power. In addition to a number of book chapters and articles, he has published two co-edited collections: Our Turn To Eat (2010), which covers the politics of Kenya since independence, and The Handbook of African Politics (2013). A monograph, Democracy in Africa, will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2014 and a second book, How to Rig An Election, is currently under contract with Yale. Nic spends much of his time explaining the implications of his work to policy makers, including the Cabinet Office, Foreign Office, and the Department for International Development of the UK government, the Instituto Rio Branco of the Brazilian government, the Lagos State Government, the Pan African Parliament, and the World Bank. He is the joint editor of African Affairs, an advisor to the African Progress Panel, and a member of the advisory board of the UNICEF Chair on Communication Research (Africa).

chernykh_photoSvitlana Chernykh (svitlana.chernykh@lac.ox.ac.uk) is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Comparative Presidentialism at the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, University of Oxford and a Junior Research Fellow at St Antony’s College. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2011. Prior to coming to Oxford, she was a senior researcher and project manager of the Comparative Constitutions Project at the Cline Centre for Democracy. Her research focuses on democratization, political institutions (parties, constitutions, elections), and executive-legislative relations. Her work has appeared in journals such as Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Politics, Constitutional Political Economy, and Political Communication. For more please see: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~latc0045/SChernykh/Site.html.

alistaircoleAlistair Cole (alistair.cole@sciencespo-lyon.fr) obtained his D.Phil from Balliol College, Oxford (1986). He held positions in Oxford, Caen, Aston, Keele and Bradford before being named as Professor of European Politics at Cardiff University in 1999. Since January 1st, 2015, he has been Professor of Comparative Politics at the Institute of Political Studies, Lyons, France. He has published extensively in the field of comparative European politics, especially on France.

 


Screen Shot 2014-02-03 at 12.28.33Michaela Collord
 (michaela.collord@gmail.com) is a PhD candidate in politics at the University of Oxford. She completed a BA in Politics and an MPhil in African Studies at the University of Cambridge. Her research centres on executive-legislative relations and legislative institutionalization in sub-Saharan Africa with a primary focus on East Africa. She has published articles with Think Africa Press and New Left Project on topics including parliament’s budgetary oversight and MPs’ constituency work in Uganda. She has experience working for the Uganda Women’s Parliamentary Association where she assisted with programme development and policy design.

 

Jack CorbettJack Corbett (j.corbett@soton.ac.uk) is Associate Professor in Politics at the University of Southampton. He is the author of “Being Political: Leadership and Democracy in the Pacific Islands” (Hawaii) and his work has appeared in journals such as Comparative Political Studies, Journal of European Public Policy, Democratization, and Politics and Gender. You can follow him on academia.edu: https://soton.academia.edu/JackCorbett and Twitter: @jack_corbett456.

 

 

Shubhankar DamShubhankar Dam (shubdam@cityu.edu.hk) is an Associate Professor of Law at the City University of Hong Kong. Previously he held a post at Singapore Management University School of Law. Prior to joining CityU, he completed his Bachelor of Civil Laws from the University of Oxford and a Master of Laws from Harvard Law School. He specializes in the fields of law and governance in India and comparative political institutions. His book Presidential Legislation in India: The Law and Practice of Ordinances (2014) was published by Cambridge University Press (New York). Standing at the intersection of constitutional law and political science, Presidential Legislation in India offers a new frame by which to make sense of decree authority in parliamentary and presidential systems. He has published articles in US law reviews and in peer-reviewed journals published from Australia, India, the Netherlands, Singapore and the United Kingdom. The winner of several teaching awards, Dam has held visiting positions in universities in Australia, Germany and India.

Attachment-1David Doyle (david.doyle@politics.ox.ac.uk) is an Associate Professor of Comparative Politics (Latin America) at the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford, and a Fellow of St Hugh’s College. He is also a Fellow of the Latin American Centre. His general research interests comprise the comparative politics and political economy of Latin America. Currently, his research is concerned with the political economy of partisanship across Latin America. He is involved in a large project examining the displayed position, and movement, of Latin America presidents in their annual addresses to the legislature. His work has appeared (or is forthcoming) in journals such as the American Politicial Science Review, the British Journal of Political Studies, Comparative Political Studies, Political Research Quarterly, the Journal of Public Policy, and Latin American Politics and Society. For a full list of publications and more details about his research, please visit his personal wesbsite here.

photo_AFAnna Fruhstorfer is a postdoctoral researcher at Humboldt University Berlin at the Department of Social Sciences. Her main area of research is Comparative Politics, with a regional emphasis in Eastern Europe. Her research concentrates on presidents, parliaments and the relation of law and politics, in particular constitutional politics. She is also affiliated with the University of Texas at Austin via the Comparative Constitutions Project.

 

 

Eugene Huskey PhotoEugene Huskey (ehuskey@stetson.edu) is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Political Science at Stetson University. A specialist in politics and legal affairs of the Soviet Union and the successor states of Russia and Kyrgyzstan, he received his Ph.D. in 1983 from the London School of Economics and Political Science and taught at Colgate University and Bowdoin College before joining the Stetson faculty in his native Florida in 1989. The author of Presidential Power in Russia (1999) and other books on Russian politics and state institutions, his most recent publications include a chapter on the Russian executive in Historical Legacies of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe and an article in Post-Soviet Affairs that explains the dramatic regional divide in turnout in the 2011 Kyrgyzstani presidential election.

yiannos smallYiannos Katsourides (katsourides.yiannos@ucy.ac.cy) is Director of the Promitheas Research Institute (Nicosia) and Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, School of Advanced Studies, University of London. He also teaches part-time at the University of Cyprus, Department of Social and Political Sciences. He has previously taught at the European University Cyprus as well. His PhD thesis (University of Cyprus) is titled ‘The Origins of the Party System in Cyprus, 1878-1931’. Dr Katsourides’ research interests include Cyprus and Greek Politics, Political Parties and Party Systems, Communist and Radical Left Parties, Political Participation, Europeanization of Political Parties, and Political Institutions. His book, The History of the Communist Party in Cyprus: Colonialism, Class and the Cypriot Left (I.B. Tauris Publications), was published in July 2014. He is the author of a number of scientific articles on the party system of Cyprus, political participation and political elite and he took part in various academic conferences both in Cyprus and abroad.


pk-newPhilipp Köker
 (philipp.koeker@canterbury.ac.uk) is a Senior Research Fellow in Politics and International Relations at Canterbury Christ Church University, UK. He previously completed his doctorate and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at University College London, School of Slavonic and East European Studies. Philipp’s PhD thesis on presidential activism and veto power in Central and Eastern Europe won the ECPR Jean Blondel PhD Prize 2016 for the best thesis in politics and will be published with Palgrave Macmillan in 2017. His research is now mainly concerned with presidential veto power and elections in comparative perspective as well as party politics and electoral candidates in modern democracies. For more details, see his personal website at www.philippkoeker.com or follow him on Twitter @PhilippKoeker.

IMG_1986_propicChiara Loda (chiara.loda@dcu.ie) is an ESR Marie Curie “Post-Soviet Tensions” ITN Fellow. Currently she is writing her doctoral thesis at Dublin City University, researching the foreign policy discourse and practice of Armenia, Georgia and Azerbaijan within the framework of international relations.

 

 

user_portraitSophia Moestrup (smoestrup@ndi.org) is Deputy Director for the National Democratic Institute’s (NDI) Central and West Africa team in Washington, DC, USA. She has worked for NDI since 2005 on all aspects of the design and implementation of democracy support programs in the region, focusing on Francophone Africa in particular. She has served as country director in Niger for the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA) and worked for the UN in Cameroon. She is co-editor of Semi-Presidentialism and Democracy (Palgrave MacMillan, 2011) with Robert Elgie and Yu-Shan Wu. She holds a PhD in political science from the George Washington University.

şule özsoy photo1Şule Özsoy Boyunsuz (sozsoy@gsu.edu.tr) is at the Galatasaray University, Turkey. Her research and teaching interests cover constitutional law, governmental systems and European human rights law. She has published several articles and books, including Parliamentary Systems with Presidents (Oniki Levha yayınları, Turkish), Measuring Compatibility with the European Convention on Human Rights: Turkish Example in the Free Speech Context (Galatasaray University Press), and The Making of the 1982 Turkish Constitution (Oniki Levha yayınları, Turkish).

 

tapio_raunio_pieni kuvaTapio Raunio (tapio.raunio@uta.fi) is professor of political science at the University of Tampere. His research interests include national legislatures and political parties, the Europeanization of domestic politics, the European Parliament, semi-presidentialism and the Finnish political system. He has published articles in journals such as Comparative European Politics, European Journal of Political Research, European Union Politics, Journal of Common Market Studies, Journal of European Public Policy, Party Politics, Scandinavian Political Studies, and West European Politics. Raunio is the co-author of Finland in the European Union (2003, with Teija Tiilikainen), and the co-editor of National Parliaments within the Enlarged European Union: From ’victims’ of integration to competitive actors? (2007, with John O’Brennan) and Connecting with the Electorate? Parliamentary Communication in EU Affairs (2014, with Katrin Auel). He is currently leading with David Arter a research project that examines the links between Nordic parliaments and MPs and their electorates.

Roody ReserveRoody Réserve is the Director of the Master Programme in Political Science, at the Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas (UCA, El Salvador). His research interest cover the comparative poltics of Central America, State Capacity, President and Legislative relations, Parties and Party Systems in Haiti and Central America.

 

 

atsurtsumia_websiteAnn Tsurtsumia-Zurabashvili, is Marie Curie Fellow at Dublin City University, researching counter-recognition and reintegration strategies in the post-Soviet space. Previously, she led the Political Party Assistance Programme at the Netherlands Institute for Multiparty Democracy (NIMD) and Parliamentary Communications Center at the National Democratic Institute (NDI) (2009-2013). She has served as a Policy Fellow at the Georgian Foundation for Security and International Studies (GFSIS) (2011-2012). Furthermore, Ann has contributed to number of research projects on strategic planning in political parties, achieving gender balance in the parliament and the role of civil society in policy formulation. She holds and MA in European Studies from Tallinn/Tampere Universities, and BA in International Relations from Tbilisi State University.

VeenendaalWouter Veenendaal (w.p.veenendaal@fsw.leidenuniv.nl) is an assistant professor in political science at Leiden University, the Netherlands. His research focuses on politics, democracy, and governance in small states, and he has conducted field research in various small states around the world. His current project addresses the question why small states have more stable political systems than large ones, despite the weakness of political structures and strongly personalized politics. He partially conducts this project as a research fellow at the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV), where he worked before as a postdoctoral researcher. Wouter’s work has been published in journals such as Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Democratization, and Party Politics, and in 2018 his new book on democratization in small states will be published with Oxford University Press (co-authored with Jack Corbett).

21yapO. Fiona Yap (fiona.yap@anu.edu.au) is an Associate Professor at the Crawford School of Public Policy, College of Asia and the Pacific, Australian National University. Her main research interests are in public policy and political economy of East and Southeast Asia. Her research work is available through international journals such as the British Journal of Political Science, Comparative Political Studies, Journal of Theoretical Politics, Social Science Quarterly, Australian Journal of Political Science, Journal of East Asian Studies, Korea Observer, and Japanese Journal of Political Science as well as chapter contributions in edited volumes. She is co-editor of the Asia and the Pacific Policy Journal, advisory board member of internationally-funded Korea Institute at the Australian National University, editorial board member for the Korea Observer journal and Asian Journal of Political Science, and editor of Annual Editions: Comparative Politics for McGraw-Hill (2009-2013). Prior to joining the Crawford School, she was an associate professor at the Department of Political Science at the University of Kansas, with research affiliations at the Center for East Asian Studies and the Institute of Political and Social Research.

We welcome guest posts. If you would like to contribute, then please contact Robert Elgie (robert.elgie@dcu.ie).

Previous contributors:

Marina Calculli (marina.calculli@unive.it)
Lori Cox Han (lhan@chapman.edu)
Paola Rivetti (paola.rivetti@dcu.ie)
Stanley Samarasinghe (ssamara1963@gmail.com)
Lise Storm (L.Storm@exeter.ac.uk)

2 thoughts on “Contributors

  1. Vello Pettai

    I have to hand it to your team! Estonia’s new president Kersti Kaljulaid is barely a few months in office and she’s already been incorporated into your masthead! Impressive!

    Reply

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